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Preppers List and Guide PROJECT
#1
This area is different then the other area's on the site. It is to collect information
to put together a GENERAL PLANNER for everyone here to copy or download
when completed through the help of all members. Everyone is asked to please help
and participate to get this project done soon. It takes a lot of work putting together
a PLANNER for all to use when SHTF but just think, if your computer is no longer
useable, papers and notebooks will get you through.

Thank you in advance for all the help..................
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#2
What do you do when equipment fails in the field? Even the best of gear wears out, is torn by climbing difficult terrain,
or other circumstances beyond your control. Do you carry items for repair of gear, or do you figure you won't be using it
long enough for it to. Duct tape, large needles, fishing line, patch materiel, what if any do you carry in your B.O.B.?
When the excrement hits, there will not be a Cabellas, or Surplus store to replace it from, what are your plans for those
situations? Can you repair your leaky tent when a falling branch in a storm puts a hole in it? Can you repair that strap
on your pack holding gear, or it to your sholder?
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#3
I think this is an aspect of a bigger problem I've observed in the greater preparation community, even in my short tenure.... there seems to be a lot of people who are overdependent on having multiple lighters in their bag. They scoff at people who practice bushcraft, and the bushcraft practitioners scoff at the people with bags.

I think having a lighter is pretty handy. But I'm very keen on learning how to make fire without one, so that I can save that lighter for emergencies or god forbid still be able to create a fire if I lose said lighter.

You're one day out from SHTF. You made it 10 miles on foot yesterday, which is pretty darn good considering the terrain you covered. You barely got camp set up when you keeled over from exhaustion... and when you woke up, that $300 MOLLE equipped tactical bag from 5.1 you cherished for the past three years is gone. I hope this never happens, but now what do you do? You can't hop on the forums and ask.

I think it's amazing how many people are prepared to face the fact that every human on this planet may be out for blood, but how few are actually prepared to face the day when their bag may not serve them anymore.
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#4
This is also my biggest fear and the reason I have been teaching my kids to make fire with anything besides a match or lighter. They love the steel wool and 9 volt battery method!! They aren't as happy with just using two pieces of wood, lol. Once it cools off a little here, we will learn the drill method using cordage. We all need to know how to make fire without a fire-starter, matches, or a lighter.

One all the food runs out that you have prepped, do you know how to replace it in land that has almost be striped clean of wild life? Do you know what wild plants are REALLY safe to eat? When your life depends on it, is that book that has plant pictures of two plants that look almost alike, one being deadly - the other a life saver, are you going to chance it when you don't really know for sure? This is my worry, one that just flat out depresses me.
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#5
My "gear & Prep's" are for last resort, when and if SHTF I will not be using them if I still have other sources like edible plants, game to hunt etc..

Its always been my plan, my preps are for last resort. not first. post SHTF.

My preps as they are now can last me myself for about 18 months. But I now have two others to concern myself with so that makes it about 6 months now.

I got to get busy!
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#6
Tongue 
I think you make a great point. Things will break, wear out or be lost despite how careful we endeavour to be.
This is why my husband and I spend just as much time building skills as we do planning and building our preps. We're each better at some things than the other person but also try to share knowledge and experience as much as we can.
Sometimes it's very, very tempting to think 'I don't need to know how to reload - he's got it all under control'. He hates gardening.
But we each remind the other that we won't be around forever and the end may be unexpected. I want to know that he can recognise some edible foods and he wants to know that I have enough basic knowledge to work out the reloading stuff.

So we build skills and practice them as much as possible in our everyday lives.
Of course, that makes us appear a bit nutty and that's okay. LOL :wink:
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#7
(06-26-2012, 05:51 PM)Nessienoo Wrote: I think you make a great point. Things will break, wear out or be lost despite how careful we endeavour to be.
This is why my husband and I spend just as much time building skills as we do planning and building our preps. We're each better at some things than the other person but also try to share knowledge and experience as much as we can.
Sometimes it's very, very tempting to think 'I don't need to know how to reload - he's got it all under control'. He hates gardening.
But we each remind the other that we won't be around forever and the end may be unexpected. I want to know that he can recognise some edible foods and he wants to know that I have enough basic knowledge to work out the reloading stuff.

So we build skills and practice them as much as possible in our everyday lives.
Of course, that makes us appear a bit nutty and that's okay. LOL :wink:
What a great post. Skills are #1 needs of all preppers. Share those skills. Teach everyone how to do everything. Maybe only one is the main re-loader, but at least two more should know how. Don't be stingy with your knowledge.
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#8
Great thread mongoose
I had alot of these same concerns last year,so I made sure I bought repair kits for everything. Tent,tarp,canvas,2 huge sewing kits plus Items I had on hand,saved material over the years climbing for repairs on packs and gear. For right now I feel Im set for about 20 years give or take alittle.Dont forget the zip ties love those dam things should be in everyones BoL.
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#9
(06-27-2012, 04:32 PM)climbhigh Wrote: How will I fight off boredom?
One thing that has haunted me is when the SHTF, how can I pass the time without going completely stir crazy? Obviously, there will be many chores and a lot of labor involved in daily life after a collapse, but there will also be hours upon hours of sitting in a quiet house. My kids will be involved in chores of the day, but what can I do to reduce the monotony of a grid down situation? I plan on stockpiling books on many different subjects. Fiction and nonfiction. How to’s and stories. A bow and arrow can provide hours of target practice as well as developing a survival skill. Decks of cards can provide entertainment as well as bartering potential. If you go to a casino, you can get decks of cards for 50 cents. Puzzles, board games, pads of paper and plenty of writing utensils. Anything that can hopefully make life more fun for the family to escape reality, even for a moment. Don’t forget the most important book of them all, the Bible.

Excellent post, and while there's topics of discussion across the whole spectrum I wanted to address this one specifically. Maybe I'm odd, maybe that's why I'm here... but I think this is only a consideration if you're truly stuck in the here and now, the hustle and bustle, and the illusion that "there just isn't enough time in the day". Part of the reason we've become so detached and distant from the world is because somebody said that phrase once, and everybody else believed them. There's more than enough time in the day, just live in the moment and you'll find it.

I love camping, not just because of being outdoors or campfires or fishing (all great things)... but because it gives you a chance to slow down and appreciate the moment. I have no worries of being bored if the world as we know it disappears, in fact I think the world needs a good reset along those lines. Imagine being able to wake up in the morning and know the work you're doing that day is actually going to benefit you and your neighbors. Imagine knowing that when it's all done you'll feel like you accomplished something, and imagine being able to sit down at the end of the day and reflect. Think of the things you can accomplish tomorrow, think of the things you accomplished that day. Think of the things around you, think of your family, think of what's up there, and just ... think. Think of the possibilities.

I have no fear I'll ever be bored if given the opportunity to live the way we were probably meant to live this whole time. None at all.
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#10
I agree with you bud. Iv been there and done that 3 months in the ochocos was straight work every day. There was no time for being board and tons of wild life all around wild horse.Every day had to go and make trips to the creek for water gather wood chop wood we would collect sap for the fire.One little piece with alittle flame wood go poof. Then there was hunting,gutting,skinning and cutting the meat off the bones then soak the meat in a brime to prepair it for the smoker.Then you are always watching the smoker,mine was huge took a normal fire to run it.We would do it at night to keep forest rangers from thinking there was an out of control fire.personaly I was never board.I also had to work the hides and there is alot of work to that too.Confusedmile:
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