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Weapon Recommendation Thread
#21
Okay, he is adamant in wanting a hand gun. Leaning towards a Sig, Glock or Barretta 9mm. Any info on these?? He is wanting something that is easier to teach the kids with now.
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#22
Yes to the long gun.
If you can afford only one, and make it a 12 gauge.



If you are looking for defense you have to consider where it will be used.
You will need to defend yourself in a public place at some point.
There was an excellent article (will look for it) from Fer Fal (I think) about the collapse in Argentina. He stated that the best self defense weapon is a handgun, it is concealable in public as a long gun isn't.

If he is insistent on a pistol do not go with a 9mm. U.S. Marines recently ordered $22.5M of colt .45's. Guess they wanted something guaranteed to stop something.

My opinion --- 1911, I have carried one for 42years, and it has stopped, in it's tracks everything it has hit.
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#23
(08-18-2012, 08:41 PM)Mongoose Wrote: Yes to the long gun.
If you can afford only one, and make it a 12 gauge.



If you are looking for defense you have to consider where it will be used.
You will need to defend yourself in a public place at some point.
There was an excellent article (will look for it) from Fer Fal (I think) about the collapse in Argentina. He stated that the best self defense weapon is a handgun, it is concealable in public as a long gun isn't.
Oh that is funny Goose - we were talking about what Hiker said while you were typing and Hubby was making the exact points you just made and even used Argentina as an example. He couldn't remember the man's name but he remembered reading the story. He also mentioned it would be easier to conceal after shtf, when you didn't want everyone bad guy around to know you were carrying.
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#24
I am a Glock person for CCW. I have weak wrists and can easily handle a Glock 19, Generation 4, 9mm. Also shot a Generation 3, 9mm with no problem. The Generation 4 can be transformed to a 22 calliber. 22 ammo is easy to obtain and cheap to target plink.
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#25
For long range hunting and plain ordinary hitting the target and not be so close, then for novices this is it.
I have always said a .22 long, Ruger is perfect. Will do its job great. Stay away from
AK's and all those talked about military style weapons. First off the ammo will be hard to get and even now
the price has skyrocketed and SHTF hasn't happened yet. Also those will be the very first confiscated.
There goes your hard earned money.
.22 ammo is still easy to obtain and relatively cheap (FOR NOW). Plus easier on the arms of those not accustomed
to firing weapons. Their range is under 100 yards so don't be deceived by gun dealers who try to sell you more
powerful weapons at a much high cost. If you can't shot a .22 at a distance then a powerful, expensive weapon,
will make no difference. Its the shooter that matters.

As for handgun a Ruger SR-22 Rimfire is your best bet. Its a great concealment weapon and easy to hold grip. Great for both
male and female. Love it.................. also it costs about $350 but the quality is unsurpassed. Cheap weapons can blow up, break down easy and
lock up when you need them the most. Your life shouldn't be balanced on a budget.

Hope this helps.
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#26
(08-18-2012, 08:39 PM)Whiteangel Wrote: Okay, he is adamant in wanting a hand gun. Leaning towards a Sig, Glock or Barretta 9mm. Any info on these?? He is wanting something that is easier to teach the kids with now.


A Glock might be a great gun, but it doesn't have a safety. I wouldn't want a gun without a safety, but I especially wouldn't want a kid to be handling a gun with no safety. The New York Police had to go to a longer trigger pull on their Glocks, because they kept shooting themselves in the butts.

If you want something to teach the kids with, I would personally go with something like a Taurus 22 Revolver, and for several reasons. First, the ammo is cheap, so they could practice a lot without costing you much money. That would also be a good thing for the adults to practice with. Who can afford to do a lot of practice shooting using a 45 cal., and the weight of the 9 shot Taurus 22 is fairly heavy, so bigger guns wouldn't be that much of a difference. ... except for the recoil. Secondly, a revolver isn't very likely to jam or have a problem. Someone just learning isn't going to be comfortable with the gun to start with, but if it jams on them, they just might do something stupid trying to get the jammed cartridge out. I like simple.

Inahme says, 9mm's are only good if you squat to tinkle, and it isn't really a gun unless it starts with a .4 .....
Taurus makes a really nice Taurus Millennium Pro 45 cal. → semi-auto ... it is sweet! It doesn't have much recoil, and after you fire, the site drops right back onto your target. Me being a female, and it being a .45, I figured it would have a lot of kick. Not so ... I loved shooting it ... awesome weapon ... not real heavy to hold and fairly small.

I guess you notice that I like the Taurus brand. Anytime we have ever had a problem with one of them, which isn't often, they had us ship it overnight to them and had it fixed and back in two days ... they also reimbursed us for the overnight shipping. The wait on a Smith and Wesson is about 6 months, and other gun manufacturers are much the same.

I really should get Inahme on this thread, cause he knows a lot more than I do ... I am learning from him!
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#27
Great info folks, thanks and keep them coming!!
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#28
Alrighty. I'm going to be myself, which means I'm going to go against the flow on this one.

If you can have only one gun, and only one, I don't recommend a shotgun. Hear me out; in any situation where you have to deal with an active shooter, the best course of action is to disengage and retreat. Period. Find a way out, and leave. You don't always have that option though, and if we're talking a shtf situation, people will act like dogs and rove in groups, I am almost positive of that. Having six rounds available to you before you have to reload is going to get you killed; this is a rule with sidearms, and this is a rule with long guns.

If you can have only one gun, I implore you to purchase a black gun. An AR-15 or one of it's close cousins, even an AK if that's your cup of tea, but something that can hold 30 rounds minimum and can be reloaded much faster than any shotgun (running two magazines in tandem you can easily train to reload in under five seconds). They are multi-functional, just like a shotgun, in that they make excellent cqb weapons, and can easily be used for hunting. You also don't have to spend 4 digits to get a functional weapon, the new Mossberg MMR can be had for as low as $700. A Stag Arms executive survival kit is pretty darned neat too.

If you go with a handgun, the same logic applies. More ammo is better. This is why a lot of people prefer 9mm, including the Navy Seals. I like .40 because it gives me a larger round while still allowing me to carry higher capacity magazines than a .45 would. I don't like Glocks, but I think that's more a personal preference than anything to do with the safety... I think they're just ugly guns. Sig Sauer, Springfield, and Taurus make some excellent pistols.

I don't fully agree with Whiteangel on this one, sidearms don't need full safeties. If your attacker is under the 21 feet and coming at you with a knife, and you have exactly 2 seconds to react, do you want to mess with a safety? Keep your finger off the trigger and your gun won't discharge into your buttocks. If you have kids in the house, a safety is not going to keep them safe. A gun safe will, and being aware at all times of where your weapon is (if it's not in the safe, it better be in your holster). This is not a situation where you have the luxury of making a "simple mistake". If you accept the responsibility of owning a gun, you need to accept the responsibility that it is more important than answering the phone, watching tv, or "just leaving it there for a second".

Sorry for prattling on. I should edit this and probably shorten it, but... I'm too lazy. Big Grin
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#29
Dannydefense, thank you for that! Excellent!! Got the .40 and some others. Shot guns are the ones we dont have. So Im debating on investing on more expensive/versatile type again(then be hurting for a while) or going lower with the shotguns. Im thinking with funds tight, and with thinking to speed the preps up in weapons area. So pondering, do we invest in the higher ones 1 at a time or maybe a couple of lower cost shotguns. The more the marryer, write?(thinking a long term shtf situation/weapon break downs etc)? But maybe not the case? Im leaning shotguns, then the more versatile. So little money and so little time to get it done. Also, arent shotguns pretty much only good for close range? But really do the job!

This is a weapons thread. Seems for guns etc. But I also think of weapons in the preps also with knives, bow and arrows etc.
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#30
(08-24-2012, 02:35 PM)Harvesttime Wrote: But maybe not the case? Im leaning shotguns, then the more versatile. So little money and so little time to get it done. Also, arent shotguns pretty much only good for close range? But really do the job!
Shotguns can be effective out to 150 yards, and possibly even 200 if you're a marksman. The reason this makes a shotgun so versatile is that you will rarely, if ever (even in shtf) be in a gun battle that spans a greater distance. The problem is that you have to load slugs in order to be successful at that range, and will have to juggle buckshot and slugs depending on your circumstance.

A rifle on the other hand can be deployed in almost any close quarters combat scenario with the exception of a few, and still remain lethal out to 600 yards without changing magazines. There are very few situations where a rifle is ineffective and in those situations (from inside a vehicle, etc) a shotgun would be just as useless... enter your sidearm, folding stock class III weapons (as mentioned earlier, difficult to obtain, but not impossible), ar type pistols, uzis, etc...

If it's a matter of waiting an extra week, or month... get a rifle. If it's a matter of limited funds and necessity to buy a weapon now, get a shotgun. But honestly when a decent shotgun costs in the neighborhood of $4-600 fully decked out (you're going to need a sling, shells, preferably an optic because it's hard to hit anything at 150 yards with the irons, a receiver or stock mounted shell holder considering your limited depending on the size of the shell and tube), and a respectable and often times well equipped rifle starts at as low as $100 more than that...

Don't get me wrong. Everybody should have a shotgun in their arsenal, I'm not downplaying them as suitable weapons. They're fantastic weapons that are extremely well suited to many situations. But if I could only have one long gun, I'd want a rifle (since somebody is going to call me on it eventually, technically we're speaking about carbines).
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